Say no to ‘no-reply’ email addresses

It is becoming more widely accepted that ‘no-reply’ email addresses can be harmful to an email campaign. The ‘no-reply’ email address effectively stops, or tries to put people off from, replying to your emails. While this may help to ensure that your inbox doesn’t become cluttered, it gives a negative message to readers – in effect, you don’t want to hear back from them. This probably isn’t good for business. If you still use ‘no-reply’ email addresses in your business/email marketing communications, this post contains some reasons why you might want to stop.

 No reply email

Email deliverability will be affected

Many email services and Internet Service Providers (ISPs) detect the response of an email’s recipient to gauge whether the email is legitimate or not. Whether a recipient opens, clicks, replies, unsubscribes, forwards or deletes the message determines whether the message is considered as ‘good’ or as ‘spam’. Gmail, for example, ranks the importance of an email based on the recipient’s action – if the recipient replies, Gmail is more likely to class the email as ‘important’. If your recipient can’t reply, your emails are likely to end up in the Spam/Junk folders (read more about keeping your emails out of spam in an earlier post).

Some people also don’t look for the (sometimes very small) unsubscribe link, instead hitting ‘reply’ to request they be unsubscribed from the mailing list. If they then learn that replying is not possible (either because the reply email starts with ‘no-reply’ or similar, or their email is returned undelivered), they are then likely to click ‘report spam’. You can read more about spam management and delivery rates in one of our other posts.

Missed chance to be added to contact lists

One way to ensure that your email reaches the recipient’s inbox is if your email address has been added to their contact list (this means it has been ‘whitelisted’). Most ISPs do not allow users to add ‘no-reply’ emails to their address books. If they are unable to reply to your emails, they are also unlikely to add you manually. Email providers like Gmail and Yahoo automatically add an email address to a contact list if the user sends a message to it so it makes sense that recipients should be able to respond.

Reduced conversion rate

In the age of social media and online identities/persona, receiving communications from a ‘machine/robot’ means that the sender of an email has no personal touch. People probably still like to feel that there is a real person sending the email to them! With a ‘no-reply’ email, it is much less likely that the recipient will take action on what is in the email. Using an address like ‘customer-services’ or a real name is likely to be much more effective when encouraging customers to respond to a call to action. Similarly, make sure the name that appears in the recipient’s inbox shows your brand clearly (e.g. ‘Simplelists Account Verification’ rather than just ‘Account Verification’).

Makes it harder to keep your email list up to date

Some people also hit ‘reply’ to update their details with you. A real email address will allow you to find valuable information in the replies that will ensure that your contact list is kept up-to-date. Excluding incorrect email addresses from your mailing list will also help your deliverability rates and prevent your messages from being sent to spam.

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